AM Roundup: Twitch, Facebook’s Clickbait Crackdown & Siracusa’s Reviews

Good morning. Some headlines in tech over the last 12 or so hours that aren’t mobile-specific but are making an impact on the larger tech ecosystem:

Amazon bought Twitch for a little over a billion dollars, $970 million of that in cash, according to Eric Johnson at Re:Code. The video game livestreaming service, which came out of Y-Combinator 2007 class’s Justin.tv, has 55 monthly active users, the brunt of which are free and being monetized off of advertising. However, there’s a growing subscription business that makes up 600,000 users, giving the service a more diversified revenue stream which I’m sure appealed to the folks at Amazon. What was especially interesting about this story is that Twitch was already marked as an acquisition target just days earlier by Google; however, sources at the WSJ say the search giant got cold feet over the last few weeks and pulled the plug on the deal. (edit: Business Insider, citing Forbes, claims it broke down due to antitrust issues)  That gave Amazon the opportunity to sneak in and complete the transaction. So was this a strategic move for Amazon or merely a defensive acquisition to make Google weaker by proxy?

Facebook’s news feed algorithm, EdgeRank, will attempt to crack down on linkbait-y headlines. So the media organizations that make a living off of hyperbolic headlining (BuzzFeed, Upworthy & a host of others) will now be subject to what amounts to informal penalties: their stories will be given less weight by the algorithm and will not show up nearly as frequently in most users’ news feeds. The algorithm will also be giving credence to publishers who post links using Facebook’s now-standard paste-a-link format (which automatically produces the URL/caption) rather than pasting that link within the context of the article itself. You can see examples of both scenarios on Facebook’s press page announcing the changes, which explains it in better detail.

Finally, this was an interesting interview with John Siracusa, he of the exponentially long Mac OSX review. (You can see examples of this at his Ars Technica author page) Some would say he’s swimming against the tide by writing such long-form content but his argument is that people are actually starving for this kind of in-depth analysis, which is hard to argue against considering his reviews actually sell as E-Books on Amazon….and more importantly, sell well.